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Monday, September 10

  1. page Climate & Arctic Scientist Podcasts edited ... In this presentation, Dr. Steven J. Hastings explains the effects of historical climate change…
    ...
    In this presentation, Dr. Steven J. Hastings explains the effects of historical climate change on the Alaskan North Slope.
    Historical Climate Change with Dr. Steven J. Hastings
    Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.
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  2. page Home edited ... Source: http://parkerarctic.blogspot.com/2009/07/home.html *This curriculum development is su…
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    Source: http://parkerarctic.blogspot.com/2009/07/home.html
    *This curriculum development is supported by an International Polar Year grant from the National Science Foundation, Arctic Social Science Program/Office of Polar Programs as part of a grant to Rutgers University, Principal Investigator Hal Salzman (Grant #0732973). The curriculum was developed by the Francis Parker Charter School, Devens, MA. Copyright for all material is reserved by Rutgers University and the Francis Parker Charter School; it may be reproduced in whole or in part for educational or training purposes, subject to the inclusion of the above acknowledgment of the source and funder (NSF). It may not be used for commercial use or sale. Reproduction for purposes other than those indicated above requires the prior written permission from Rutgers University.
    Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.

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Thursday, December 22

  1. page Climate Change and the Arctic edited Climate Change and the Arctic Essential Questions ... climate changing? Enduring Understand…
    Climate Change and the Arctic
    Essential Questions
    ...
    climate changing?
    Enduring Understandings
    · The temperature of earth is dependent on the balance (equilibrium) between incoming energy (sun’s radiation) and outgoing energy (reflected radiation and emitted infra red (heat) radiation). The earth’s atmosphere plays a huge role in moderating that equilibrium.
    ...
    Climate Change and the Arctic
    Tracking Temperature Assessment
    Albedo Effect
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  2. page Climate Change and the Arctic edited Arts Climate Change and Humanities Environment and Culture - The Inupiat Culture the Arctic …
    ArtsClimate Change and Humanities
    Environment and Culture - The Inupiat Culture
    the Arctic
    Essential Questions
    · How does environment affect the development and evolution of a culture?
    · How do the people in a culture relate to
    why is the environment in which they live?Arctic climate changing?
    Enduring Understandings
    · PlaceThe temperature of earth is dependent on the balance (equilibrium) between incoming energy (sun’s radiation) and history affectoutgoing energy (reflected radiation and emitted infra red (heat) radiation). The earth’s atmosphere plays a huge role in moderating that equilibrium.
    · The climate of
    the developmentArctic is significantly affected by:
    · The intensity
    of all aspectssunlight reaching the surface,
    · The different amounts
    of a cultureabsorption of sunlight between ice and water and
    · Changes in
    the identitytemperature of its people.
    · Elements of a culture are preserved or changed when cultures interact or
    the environment changes. earth’s atmosphere.
    Overview
    The curriculum ideasIn this unit we have included in these units are a result of a trip taken by five middle school teacherstry to Barrow, Alaska, in July of 2009, sponsored byunderstand how the National Science Foundation. FromArctic climate is affected by, and contributes to the people we met,overall balance of energy in the places we stayed,Earth system and consider the resources we brought home, we have put together a seriesimplications of lessons that we have used or plansignificant climate change. This unit can be taught as an introduction to useclimate change on its own but it fits well as a follow up unit to the “Life in our classrooms at Francis W. Parker Charter School, in Devens, Massachusetts. We are humble in our understanding of the Inupiat culture,Arctic” Unit, which introduces students to the Arctic environmentecosystem and the effectsdelicate interconnectedness of global changes onenvironmental conditions and animal and plant life in the Arctic. What we bringcycles.
    Climate change is a huge topic. This unit tries
    to focus on some of the subjectkey factors but there is our interest in making these topics accessible to our students, through hands-on learning.
    The lessons and resources presented here fall into three units, but they can also stand alone
    much that is left out or as additions to other curricula. Unit 1 offers students background in five Alaskan cultures. Unit 2 adds detail to several elements of the Inupiat culture, and Unit 3 examines historical and contemporary issues forjust touched on that could become the north slopebasis of Alaska.further study.
    Please see the full lesson plans below:
    Climate Change and the Arctic
    Tracking Temperature Assessment

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  3. page Math, Science, and Technology edited htmldiff1Math, Science Math, Science, and Technology htmldiff2Life Life in the Arctic html…
    htmldiff1Math, ScienceMath, Science, and Technology htmldiff2Life
    Life
    in the Arctic htmldiff3Essential Question htmldiff4·
    Essential Questions
    ·
    How have
    ...
    the Arctic? htmldiff5Enduring Understanding htmldiff6·
    Enduring Understandings
    ·
    The Arctic
    ...
    ripples throughout. htmldiff7Overview htmldiff8What
    Overview
    · What
    will students
    ...
    this unit? htmldiff9-
    ·
    Because of
    ...
    on the planetplante and consequently
    ...
    sun or 24hours24 hours of sun. htmldiff10-
    ·
    Ice in differentdifference forms is at the heart of
    ...
    Arctic ecosystems. htmldiff11-
    ·
    Melting of
    ...
    to the ecosystems. *Theseecosystem. These changes can
    ...
    seasonal changes. htmldiff12-
    ·
    The absence
    ...
    cover and 24hour24 hour sun during
    ...
    plant growth. htmldiff13- Animals’
    · Animals'
    survival is
    ...
    seasonal changes. htmldiff14-
    ·
    If a
    ...
    Arctic winter thenthan the different
    ...
    many predators. htmldiff15-
    ·
    Surviving the
    ...
    as hibernation orand migration -visiting- visiting the arcticArctic just for
    ...
    spring and summer. htmldiff16-summer
    ·
    Animal adaptations
    ...
    the connectedness betweenamong different species. htmldiff17Please
    Please
    see the
    ...
    plans below: htmldiff18Life
    Life
    in the Arctic htmldiff19Exercise
    Exercise
    - Creating Hexagon Mosaic htmldiff20Polar
    Polar
    Bears
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  4. page Math, Science, and Technology edited htmldiff1Math, Science and Technology htmldiff2Life in the Arctic htmldiff3Essential Question html…
    htmldiff1Math, Science and Technology htmldiff2Life in the Arctic htmldiff3Essential Question htmldiff4· How have animals adapted to live in the extreme conditions of the Arctic? htmldiff5Enduring Understanding htmldiff6· The Arctic ecosystem is a delicate balance of connectedness of animals, plants and their environment where a change in one part of the system will cause ripples throughout. htmldiff7Overview htmldiff8What will students understand as a result of this unit? htmldiff9- Because of the location of the Arctic at the pole the intensity of energy from the sun reaching the surface is low compared with other places on the planet and consequently there are colder temperatures and in addition periods of the year when there is no sun or 24hours of sun. htmldiff10- Ice in different forms is at heart of the different Arctic ecosystems. htmldiff11- Melting of the ice as temperatures increase causes dramatic changes to the ecosystems. *These changes can be part of the natural seasonal changes. htmldiff12- The absence of sunlight during the winter plus snow and ice cover and 24hour sun during the summer has dramatic consequences on plant growth. htmldiff13- Animals’ survival is based on delicate adaptations to take advantage of these seasonal changes. htmldiff14- If a species can evolve ways to survive the Arctic winter then the different ecosystems can provide rich food sources and not too many predators. htmldiff15- Surviving the winter can often mean behavioral adaptations such as hibernation or migration -visiting the arctic just for the spring and summer. htmldiff16- Animal adaptations often happen in sync increasing the connectedness between different species. htmldiff17Please see the full lesson plans below: htmldiff18Life in the Arctic htmldiff19Exercise - Creating Hexagon Mosaic htmldiff20Polar Bears
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  5. page Math, Science, and Technology edited Math, Science and Technology Life in the Arctic Essential Question · How have animals adapted t…
    Math, Science and Technology
    Life in the Arctic
    Essential Question
    · How have animals adapted to live in the extreme conditions of the Arctic?
    Enduring Understanding
    · The Arctic ecosystem is a delicate balance of connectedness of animals, plants and their environment where a change in one part of the system will cause ripples throughout.
    Overview
    What will students understand as a result of this unit?
    - Because of the location of the Arctic at the pole the intensity of energy from the sun reaching the surface is low compared with other places on the planet and consequently there are colder temperatures and in addition periods of the year when there is no sun or 24hours of sun.
    - Ice in different forms is at heart of the different Arctic ecosystems.
    - Melting of the ice as temperatures increase causes dramatic changes to the ecosystems. *These changes can be part of the natural seasonal changes.
    - The absence of sunlight during the winter plus snow and ice cover and 24hour sun during the summer has dramatic consequences on plant growth.
    - Animals’ survival is based on delicate adaptations to take advantage of these seasonal changes.
    - If a species can evolve ways to survive the Arctic winter then the different ecosystems can provide rich food sources and not too many predators.
    - Surviving the winter can often mean behavioral adaptations such as hibernation or migration -visiting the arctic just for the spring and summer.
    - Animal adaptations often happen in sync increasing the connectedness between different species.
    Please see the full lesson plans below:
    Life in the Arctic
    Exercise - Creating Hexagon Mosaic
    Polar Bears

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  6. page Climate Change and the Arctic edited fghfghfghfgh Arts and Humanities Environment and Culture - The Inupiat Culture Essential Questi…
    fghfghfghfghArts and Humanities
    Environment and Culture - The Inupiat Culture
    Essential Questions
    · How does environment affect the development and evolution of a culture?
    · How do the people in a culture relate to the environment in which they live?
    Enduring Understandings
    · Place and history affect the development of all aspects of a culture and the identity of its people.
    · Elements of a culture are preserved or changed when cultures interact or the environment changes.
    Overview
    The curriculum ideas we have included in these units are a result of a trip taken by five middle school teachers to Barrow, Alaska, in July of 2009, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. From the people we met, the places we stayed, and the resources we brought home, we have put together a series of lessons that we have used or plan to use in our classrooms at Francis W. Parker Charter School, in Devens, Massachusetts. We are humble in our understanding of the Inupiat culture, the Arctic environment and the effects of global changes on life in the Arctic. What we bring to the subject is our interest in making these topics accessible to our students, through hands-on learning.
    The lessons and resources presented here fall into three units, but they can also stand alone or as additions to other curricula. Unit 1 offers students background in five Alaskan cultures. Unit 2 adds detail to several elements of the Inupiat culture, and Unit 3 examines historical and contemporary issues for the north slope of Alaska.
    Please see the full lesson plans below:

    (view changes)
  7. page Climate Change and the Arctic edited fghfghfghfgh
    fghfghfghfgh
    (view changes)
  8. page Home edited ... Science Project! Introduction to the Project The trip was funded by the National Scienc…
    ...
    Science Project!
    Introduction to the Project
    The trip was funded by the National Science Foundation and was an International Polar Year project.* In July of 2009, a group of 5 middle school teachers from the Francis Parker Charter School located in Devens MA, took a trip up to Barrow Alaska. The trip was funded by the National Science Foundation. The goal was to collect first hand experience and artifacts that could be used in teaching 7th and 8th graders about the science of climate change with particular reference to its impact on the Arctic region and its people. Three of the teachers teach arts and humanities and were particularly interested in the Inupiat culture and its connections with the environment and how significant climate change might impact important traditions and ways of life. The other two teachers teach math and science and were interested in learning more about the Arctic environment and the current scientific research going on in Barrow in particular with the sea ice and permafrost.
    ...
    Life in the Arctic Curriculum
    Normally our two domains of Arts and Humanities (AH) and math, science and technology (MST) classes are taught separately but the semester following our trip we tried to do things a little differently. The AH domain had a previously planned unit on Native Americans and were intending using the Inupiat culture as the example to kick off the unit. In MST we had already planned a unit on geology of New England during this time -not the easiest topic to connect to climate change and the Arctic. So in we decided to do a special Arctic week at the end of our geology unit that would coincide with when AH was teaching about the Inupiat culture. We focused on the environment and ecology of the Arctic. Students learned about the physical aspects of the Arctic, the climate and the animals that live there and the delicate interconnectedness between the animals and their environment. The result was that students were learning about the polar bear and its dependence on the sea ice in their MST class and then going to their AH class and discovering the importance of polar bear fur in traditional garments and the dangers of meeting a polar bear whilst out hunting bowhead whales!
    Climate Change and the Arctic Curriculum
    The following year the MST domain did a unit on energy and climate, in which we focused on how the Arctic both affects, and is affected by, Earth's temperature. We tried to connect back to the work students had done the previous year in the unit, Life in the Arctic, and the understanding they had built up about the Arctic ecosystem in the hopes that they would have a stronger grasp of the significance of climate change.

    The accompanying curriculum stems from the lessons taught in the AH Native American unit and the lessons taught in the MST Arctic Week.
    {1.jpg} {2.jpg}
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